Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here. Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here. Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here. Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here. Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here.

Indiewire has a fun list of their favorite indie posters of 2014. See more here.

The international trailer for Terry Gilliam’s “Zero Theorem” finally did the trick for me. This trailer has what all trailers need: more Tilda Swinton.

Javier Grillo–Marxuach recently wrote this fantastic analysis of science fiction on television. As JGM puts it: “Ironically, sci–fi, the genre that most often suffers from underdeveloped characters… probably demands more character from its characters than any other genre. Why? Because it is, at the core, a metaphorical exercise.” 

While JGM is examining science fiction on television, the article’s relevance extends beyond both television and science fiction to storytelling of all shapes and sizes. JGM illustrates a philosophy I’ve been trying to develop in my own work. His theory deconstructs the false division between “genre” stories and “character-driven” stories. Some critics contend that serious films are character-driven while genre stories can never be serious because they prioritize spectacle and the conventions of genre over character. The truth, however, is that greatness occurs where character and genre converge, when characters drive our stories toward a deeper, metaphorical understanding of humanity. Because genres are fundamentally metaphors in and of themselves, one can argue that they allow for a deeper artistic exploration than stories driven by character alone. They allow an audience not only to empathize with characters but also to follow those characters on a metaphorical journey that, while not grounded in objective reality, can illuminate profound psychological realities. In truth, great metaphorical stories are not limited to art houses or excluded from television sets and multiplexes. They come in all shapes and sizes from Mulholland Drive to The Shining, Silent Light to Attack the Block, Raiders of the Lost Ark to Breaking the Waves, The X-Files to Top of the Lake. The one thing that all of these stories have in common is the ability to use metaphor to uncover deeper truths. Too often we waste our time judging stories based on arbitrary categories (tent-pole, indie, action, art house, horror, foreign) rather than looking toward the more important truth that great storytellers create their most compelling stories when they use metaphor to push beyond the limits of any category.

 

Indiewire has an hour’s worth of Black Swan behind-the-scenes footage. Thanks, internet! The password is: blackswan.

The first in the series appears above. More here.

chameleonmovie:

This “flying jellyfish” really has no direct connection to my script, but it’s pretty darn cool. The flying jellyfish is an aerial robot that circulates autonomously on air currents in the same way that jellyfish circulate on ocean currents. The NYU engineers who invented it claim, “A bunch of mini flying jellies could be tossed into the air from a building and float around as environmental sensors, taking data and adjusting their position when necessary.”

This is a great timeline that shows science fiction authors’ accurate predictions about the future, and when those predictions actually came true.

A fun, clickable table of popular story tropes, organized by their Wikipedia rankings. 

chameleonmovie:

It’s not quite X-ray vision, but researchers at the University of Michigan have created a form of graphene (a single layer of carbon atoms) that can sense the entire infrared spectrum. Because graphene is so thin, it can be layered onto, you guessed it, contact lenses, allowing for infra-red eyesight.

The King in Yellow

True Detective obsessives. io9 has an article you’re really going to want to read.

"Along the shore the cloud waves break,

The twin suns sink behind the lake,

The shadows lengthen

In Carcosa

Strange is the night where the black stars rise,

And strange moons circle through the skies,

But stranger still is

Lost Carcosa”

—The King in Yellow, Act I, Scene II