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A fun, clickable table of popular story tropes, organized by their Wikipedia rankings. 

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chameleonmovie:

It’s not quite X-ray vision, but researchers at the University of Michigan have created a form of graphene (a single layer of carbon atoms) that can sense the entire infrared spectrum. Because graphene is so thin, it can be layered onto, you guessed it, contact lenses, allowing for infra-red eyesight.

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Mike Judge’s Silicon Valley is hilarious. Shout out to HBO for making  the pilot available on Youtube,

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The King in Yellow

True Detective obsessives. io9 has an article you’re really going to want to read.

"Along the shore the cloud waves break,

The twin suns sink behind the lake,

The shadows lengthen

In Carcosa

Strange is the night where the black stars rise,

And strange moons circle through the skies,

But stranger still is

Lost Carcosa”

—The King in Yellow, Act I, Scene II

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If you think your boss is stubborn, wait ‘til you see what it’s like to work for a drunk, psychotic rock. 

ROCK is a little video I directed one afternoon for the Hey Neighbor comedy group. If you like it, please feel free to spread the love over your various social networks.

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Favorite Tracks of 2013 Mix

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"Mad Max is caught up with a group of people fleeing across the Wasteland in a War Rig driven by the Imperator Furiosa. This movie is an account of the Road War which follows. It is based on the Word Burgers of the History Men and eyewitness accounts of those who survived."

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Wrong Cops finally arrives on 12/20 in theaters and on VOD. Probably the most fun I’ve ever had making a movie. It’s Training Day on crack. Marilyn Manson playing a 15 year-old skater, drugs smuggled in rat corpses, fish throwing, gay cop porn, eye patches, inexplicable head tumors, bad techno, dance party funerals, unruly deer, Wrong Cops has it all. Scott Foundas calls it “insipid and pretentious.” Damn straight, Scott Foundas. Damn straight.

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chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.
chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.
chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.
chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.
chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.
chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.
In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.
     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.
     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.
     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”
According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.

chameleonmovie:

To continue on the theme of an interaction between biology and technology. Here are some examples of a less invasive approach: E-Skin & Telekinetic tattoos. There are all kinds of potential applications for this technology from simple light displays, to health monitors, to circuit board band-aids that allow us to manipulate technology with our minds.

In the New Yorker, Kim Tingley wrote a fascinating article titled “The Body Electric”  about the founding father of this technology, John Rogers.

     ”Rogers had an idea. In 2011, he and his colleagues announced the invention of a device that had hitherto seemed impossible: an integrated silicon circuit with the mechanical properties of skin.

     In the journal Science, Rogers revealed what looked like a gold bar code—the circuit—set in a transparent layer of dried glue. Photographs showed it stuck to a postdoc’s forearm, so that its wires were visible, or hidden under a temporary tattoo that featured a pirate in a Fighting Illini hat. The circuit stretched and wrinkled when spread and pinched. It was waterproof and could harvest power from radio waves, which are emitted by cell phones, to measure skin temperature, pressure from swelling, hydration level, and electrical signals from the brain and heart… A wireless medical patch would render obsolete much of the clunky diagnostic equipment in hospitals.

     Rogers’s device, hailed as the first “epidermal electronics system,” caused a sensation.”

According to the article, in addition to all sorts of medical technology companies, scientists, and artists, both DARPA and the CIA contacted Rogers in the hopes of collaborating with him, and he was given “top secret” clearance this summer.

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Crazy Russians and their short films. 

"Fortress (10 years ago war has begun, all people are dead, autopilots and computers continuing war without sense … Dropping bombs, returning to base for automatic reload, repair, because that’s their instructions …)”